Street food

Traditional Berber Food

Author & Photographer : Alessandro Del Ben

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Tunisian cuisine & Traditional food

Tunisia food

 

The Tunisian cuisine is a mix of Mediterranean and desert culinary traditions. In addition to the native Berber people, many civilizations alternated in centuries. Phoenicians, Romans, Arabs, Turkish and Franch.

Tunisian cuisine mainly based on meat, seafood, tomatoes, olive oil, spices, and vegetables.

The traditional Tunisian food has Berber elements inside. The cooking styles comes from the ancient nomads tribes, also cuisine utensils shapes originates from the habit of berbere people who always move from a place to another.

Coffe is drunk everywhere in Tunisia country but the main popular beverage is mint tea. The mint was originally used as a medicinal herb to treat stomach ache and chest pains, mint is also a good tonic and refresh from hot temperatures so very usefull for North Africa’s climes.

Couscous (semolina wheat prepared with a stew of meat and vegetables) is the National dish of Tunisia, it is cooked in a double boiler called “Kiska” or Couscoussière in French. The meat with vegetables and spices are cooked in the lower part, the steam rises through the pot above were there is the Couscous.

Meats most used include lamb and chicken but also fish like sea bass, red snapper and sometimes quail or hare.

Other typical Tunisian dishes are Tajine ( different from Morocco, made with beaten eggs, cheese, meat and vegetables ), Shorba (soups), salads, pastas, stews, Kaak (pastries), Merguez (lamb sausage), Samsa (a traditional pastry), Shakshouka (ratatouille) and Gnawiya.

During the ceremonial occasions sweet or colorful dishes are prepared and are a symbol of religious hoidays. For weddings sweets are added to Couscous.

Berber food

berber food

A mix of potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, onion, garlic, olives, harissa and spices coocked into a clay amphora

berber food

 

Traditional berber foodThe taste is amazing because of the cooking way using palm branches for fire and the amphora clay for cook

Berber Focaccia bread

berber focaccia breadA special Focaccia bread cooked into the ground covered with embers and ash.

Berber food

Gazelle’s Horn

Is a sweet pastry with honey and dry fruits horn shaped

berber food

 

Tunisian Spices, Herbs & Flavoring

Like in other countries of north Africa, especially Morocco, also Tunisian traditional cuisine use many spices like coriander, garlic, ginger, cinnamon, saffron, cumin, caraway, black or white pepper, red pepper, fennel and cloves.

The Herbs used are the mint, thyme, rosemary, basil, cilantro, parsley and the Flavoring most used are Harissa , rose water, jasmine water, geranium water and orange blossom water.

Mint

Coffe is drunk everywhere in Tunisia country but the main popular beverage is mint tea. The mint was originally used as a medicinal herb to treat stomach ache and chest pains, mint is also a good tonic and refresh from hot temperatures so very usefull for North Africa’s climes.

Harissa

A popular ingredient used a lot in Tunisian traditional cuisine is Harissa, a hot red pepper sauce made of chili peppers, garlic and flavoured with olive oil, tomatoes, coriander and cumin. Harissa’s spicy level change from place to place and each family or restaurant har their special recipe.

harissa

berber food

The meat is often eaten in berber cuisine

berber food

berber food

Eggs fritter and spicy cereals soup. spices is helpful for the hot desert clime and blood circulation

Date Palm

The Tunisian Dates is really famous, the country produce the Deglet Noor quality (Dates of ligth) of this fruit, grown near Tozeur, Kebili and Tamerza in the Saharan desert, wich is the best quality of dates.

They have golden color, sweet taste and are rich in vitamins and minerals. Dates have no fat and sodium, are an excellent source of fiber and energy good for health.

dates deglet nour

dates palm

 

Author & Photographer : Alessandro Del Ben

lanuvolabianca

 

 

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